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Posts Tagged ‘UNC’

Bleeding on Antithrombotics: Reversal Protocol 2016

| Bleeding, Guideline, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Bleeding on Antithrombotics: Reversal Protocol 2016

Stephan Moll, MD writes…  Our medical center (University of North Carolina Hospitals,  Chapel Hill)  has put together a comprehensive “Emergent Anticoagulation Reversal Guideline” for our local use, updated since its last edition in 2014 with information about Pradaxa® reversal (with Praxbind®).  It is  a practical, clinical how-to document (2016 PDF here ). Colleagues and hospitals are welcome to take the document,  modify it, and apply it to their institution – there are no copyright concerns.

 

Disclosures: I have been a consultant on one occasion for Boehringer-Ingelheim.

Last updated: May 11th, 2016

Xarelto (Rivaroxaban) – Hospital Guideline

| Anticoagulants, Therapy, Uncategorized, Xarelto (Rivaroxaban) | Comments Off on Xarelto (Rivaroxaban) – Hospital Guideline

Stephan Moll, MD writes…

Xarelto® is FDA approved for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), prevention of VTE after hip and knee replacement  surgery, and for atrial fibrillation.   A number of practical management questions are encountered by physicians, pharmacists, and other health care professional taking care of patients on Xarelto®, such as (a) dosing in renal impairment, (b) conversion of a patient on warfarin to Xarelto®, (c) discontinuation of Xarelto® at times of surgery, dental procedures, colonoscopy, and other procedures, and (d) management of bleeding on Xarelto®.   These issues may best be addressed in a health care system by the establishment of a structured treatment algorithm/guide/help for the entire hospital or physician practice. Read the rest of this entry »

Pradaxa (Dabigatran) – Hospital Guideline

| Pradaxa (dabigatran), Uncategorized | 9 Comments »

The new oral anticoagulant Pradaxa® (Dabigatran) is increasingly being used as an alternative to warfarin.   A number of practical management questions are now encountered by the physician, pharmacist, or other health care professional taking care of the patient on Pradaxa®, such as (a) dosing in renal impairment, (b) conversion of a patient on warfarin to Pradaxa®, (c) discontinuation of Pradaxa® at times of surgery, dental work, colonoscopy, or other procedures, or (d) management of bleeding on Pradaxa®.   These issues may best be addressed in a health care system by the establishment of a structured treatment algorithm/guide/help for the whole hospital or physician practice. As an example, here is the document that Read the rest of this entry »