Education Blog for Healthcare Professionals

Posts Tagged ‘Anticoagulant’

Xarelto (Rivaroxaban): FDA Approved for DVT and PE Treatment

| Anticoagulants, Uncategorized, Xarelto (Rivaroxaban) | Comments Off on Xarelto (Rivaroxaban): FDA Approved for DVT and PE Treatment

Stephan Moll, MD writes…

Today is a very exciting day for patients and health care professionals: the oral anticoagulant Xarelto® (rivaroxaban) was FDA approved today (Nov 2nd, 2012) for the use in patients with DVT and PE – for the acute treatment of DVT and PE, as well as for the secondary long-term prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). The FDA announcement can be read, here. Why is this exciting? Because therapy with Xarelto is much easier for patients and health care professionals than the often cumbersome therapy with warfarin.

Read the rest of this entry »

Argatroban Nomogram

| Anticoagulants, Heparin, Therapy, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Argatroban Nomogram

Stephan Moll, MD writes…. The treatment of heparin induced thrombocytopenia may require the use of argatroban. Here is the argatroban nomogram  used at our institution, the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill.

Disclosure: I have no financial disclosures relevant to this post.

Last updated: June 25th, 2013

Minor Cuts and Nosebleeds on Anticoagulants

| Bleeding, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Minor Cuts and Nosebleeds on Anticoagulants

When a patient on warfarin bleeds more than usual it is, of course, important to make sure that the INR is not supra-therapeutic.  And, if the INR is too high, warfarin therapy needs to be adjusted and other treatment (vitamin K, etc) may have to be employed depending on the degree of INR elevation and bleeding.  However, in case of minor bleeds on anticoagulants, such as skin cuts or nosebleeds, several over-the-counter products are available and  may be helpful for the patient. Read the rest of this entry »

Prescription Assistance: When Patients Can’t Afford a Medication

| Anticoagulants, Therapy, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Prescription Assistance: When Patients Can’t Afford a Medication

Beth Waldron, Program Director of the Clot Connect project, writes….

While the cost of some outpatient anticoagulation therapies can be substantial, failure to take an anticoagulant medication as prescribed can have serious, even deadly, consequences.   Links to resources which may help patients when they are prescribed an anticoagulant that they cannot afford is available in this article.

 

Savaysa (Edoxaban): New Oral Anticoagulant

| Uncategorized | Comments Off on Savaysa (Edoxaban): New Oral Anticoagulant

Edoxaban (Savaysa®), the 4th of the big new oral anticoagulants in development (the other big 3 being Dabigatran = Pradaxa, Rivaroxaban = Xarelto, and Apixaban = Eliquis), is now commercially available in Japan (July 19th, 2011 press release here), available as once daily dosing for VTE prevention after orthopedic surgeries (hip and knee replacement and hip fracture surgery). Read the rest of this entry »

DVT and PE: How Long to Treat With Anticoagulants?

| Anticoagulants, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Therapy, Uncategorized | Comments Off on DVT and PE: How Long to Treat With Anticoagulants?

Explanation for Patients

The complex topic of “Length of Anticoagulant Treatment” for patients with VTE  is being addressed in a blog entry written for patients, found on the Clot Connect patient education blog (here).

For the Health Care Professional

Well respected treatment guidelines exist [ref 1,2]. Read the rest of this entry »

Apixaban (Eliquis®) – Another New Oral Anticoagulant

| Anticoagulants, Therapy, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Apixaban (Eliquis®) – Another New Oral Anticoagulant

Good news.  Another one of the new oral anticoagulants in development,  Apixaban (Eliquis®), has moved forward.  On May 20th, 2011, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved Eliquis® for DVT prevention after orthopedic surgery (hip and knee replacement) in the 27 countries of the European Community. In the U.S., however, Eliquis® is still some way away from getting FDA approval Read the rest of this entry »