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Archive for the ‘Clots in unusual locations’ Category

Thrombophilia – Information Handout for Patients

| Acquired risk factors, Antiphospholipid antibodies, APC resistance, Clots in unusual locations, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Factor V Leiden, Homocysteine, MTHFR, Inherited, Protein C deficiency, Protein S deficiency, Prothrombin 20210 mutation, Pulmonary Embolism, Thrombophilias, Uncategorized, Venous Clots, Whom to test, Women and blood clots | Comments Off on Thrombophilia – Information Handout for Patients

Stephan Moll, MD writes… An information article on various aspects of thrombophilia, written for patients and family members, was published today – available here – as a Vascular Disease Patient Information Page in the journal Vascular Medicine.  It addresses (a) in which patient with venous thromboembolism to consider thrombophilia  testing, (b) what tests might be appropriate to do, (c) how the test results might influence length of anticoagulation therapy (d), what contraceptives are safe to use in women with a history of DVT or PE or thrombophilia, and (e)  in which family members to consider thrombophilia testing.  This article can be used as an education handout for patients in clinic or the hospital who have DVT, PE, venous thrombosis in unusual locations, or an established thrombophilia.

 

Disclosures:  None

Last updated: April 1st, 2015

Catheter-Associated DVT of Arm and Neck in Cancer Patients: ISTH Guidance

| Clots in unusual locations, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Uncategorized, Venous Clots | Comments Off on Catheter-Associated DVT of Arm and Neck in Cancer Patients: ISTH Guidance

Stephan Moll, MD writes… This week (Feb 18th, 2014) a guidance document on the prevention and management of catheter-associated upper extremity (brachial, axillary, subclavian, and brachiocephalic veins) and neck (internal jugular) DVT was published by the International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) [ref 1].  The authors acknowledge that optimal long-term management of catheter-associated DVT has not been established.  The key recommendations: Read the rest of this entry »

TTP with I.V. Use of Pain Medication OpanaER

| Clots in unusual locations, Uncategorized | Comments Off on TTP with I.V. Use of Pain Medication OpanaER

Stephan Moll, MD writes… 

The CDC published an alert on Oct 26th, 2012, that they are investigating 12 cases of TTP (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura) in drug users who injected intravenously the opioid pain medication Opana ER® (oxymorphone extended-release), a medication made as a tablet and meant for oral use. The tablet was pulverized by the drug users to allow i.v. injection (detailed CDC alert here). 

Relevance for clinicans involved in the care of patients with TTP:  Inquire in the history taking about drug abuse and injection of Opana ER.

Last updated: Oct 29th, 2012

 

Ischemic Colitis and Thrombophilia

| Clots in unusual locations, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Ischemic Colitis and Thrombophilia

Stephan Moll, MD writes… 

Ischemic colitis is an uncommon and typically benign disorder.  For mostly unclear reasons, multiple small vessels in the colonic wall have decreased perfusion or become occluded, resulting in patchy, superficially ulcerated areas.  Typically, no surgical intervention is needed and the patient recovers spontaneously within 1-2 weeks.  Often patients have only one episode. Few people have recurrences. Read the rest of this entry »

Incidentally Discovered DVT, PE or Other Clots

| Cancer and blood clots, Clots in unusual locations, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

General comments

CT or MRI scans will occasionally detect an incidental iliofemoral DVT, PE or intra-abdominal thrombosis (IVC, portal, splenic, mesenteric or renal vein). This is particularly common in cancer patients undergoing staging CT scans. When such an incidental, asymptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) is discovered, the question arises whether the patient should be treated with anticoagulants or not. Read the rest of this entry »